After an update to the validator software on February 25, the Solana network saw a decrease in the rate at which blocks were produced. Transactions were disrupted as a consequence of the event, which prompted validators to downgrade the software in an effort to restore network speed.

At around 6:00 AM (UTC), a technical problem began, which prompted validators to downgrade to version 1.13 in an attempt to get transactions back up throughout the network. However, the downgrade was not sufficient to return Solana to regular operations, and as a result, the decision had to be made to restart the network on version v1.13.6.

“A considerable delay in block production was reported by the network about the same time as an upgrade to the validator software was being implemented. The engineers are currently investigating the underlying reason of the problem “Noting Solana’s webpage for the compass

The problem is related to the upgrading from version 1.13 to version 1.14, which slowed down the process of finalizing blocks. The Solana network is in the process of being restarted, and in order for activities to continue, it is essential to have 80 percent of active stake online:

“As additional validators finish their restart, this number will climb in accordance with the amount of stake they have delegated: this implies that bigger validators such as CEX have a disproportionately high influence on restart timeframes.”

Within the first few hours after the issue was reported, Solana’s validators got together and brainstormed potential solutions to the problem. Infrastructure provider Chorus One pointed out in a Tweeter that the event “demonstrated how really decentralized the network is.” The first chorus continued: “If we didn’t have to spend so much time debating, we could get back up in an hour. However, every step along the route is up to controversy, including whether or not to downgrade, whether or not to restart, and whether to transition from an approach of downgrading to one of restarting. Voting occurs. In the end, it takes us between 8 and 10 hours to recuperate, rather than only 1.”

This is a developing story, and further information will be posted as it becomes available. Please check back for updates.



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